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Journal Article

Citation

Chun JS, Lee S, Kim J. School Ment. Health 2021; 13(3): 473-486.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2021, Holtzbrinck Springer Nature Publishing Group)

DOI

10.1007/s12310-021-09422-0

PMID

unavailable

Abstract

This study conceptualized the protective factors for cyberbullying victimization as perceived by 43 Korean adolescents and explored gender differences in such conceptualizations using concept mapping method, a mixed-methods approach. Concept mapping revealed six major protective factors against cyberbullying victimization: 'supportive relationships' (M = 3.75, SD = 0.39), 'school's interest in cyberbullying' (M = 3.58, SD = 0.11), 'personal traits' (M = 3.57, SD = 0.22), 'reporting and monitoring system' (M = 3.51, SD = 0.36), 'education and help-seeking' (M = 3.38, SD = 0.31), and 'personal traits in online behavior' (M = 3.30, SD = 0.60). Overall, the 'supportive relationships' cluster received the highest ratings from both male and female participants. Moreover, pattern matching by gender revealed lack of agreement (r = 0.54). In particular, male participants gave higher ratings to the 'personal traits' cluster, whereas female participants perceived 'education and help-seeking' to be a more important cluster than their counterparts. These results suggest that school-based intervention strategies can be used to improve supportive relationships, personal traits, netiquette, and awareness of online behaviors. At the institutional level, an automatic reporting and monitoring system and more school-linked cyberbullying laws could be implemented.


Language: en

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