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Journal Article

Citation

Caccese J, Schmidt J, Moody J, Broglio S, McAllister T, McCrea M, Pasquina P, Buckley T, Investigators CC. Res. Sports Med. 2021; ePub(ePub): ePub.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2021, Informa - Taylor and Francis Group)

DOI

10.1080/15438627.2021.1966008

PMID

unavailable

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between sports participation history, including estimated age of first exposure (eAFE) to high-risk sports, and concussion history in first year (i.e., freshmen) collegiate athletes. Athletes increased their odds of sustaining a pre-college concussion by 5% [odds ratio(OR) = 1.05 (95%CI:1.05-1.06)] for each additional year of contact sports participation - 24% of all student athletes reported one or more pre-college concussions. When eAFE was analysed dichotomously at age 12, a greater proportion of those who started playing football before age 12 reported a positive concussion history compared to those who started playing football at age 12 or later (Х(2) = 4.483, p = 0.034, Phi = 0.049). When eAFE was analysed continuously, later eAFE to women's high-risk sports was associated with a lower likelihood of sustaining a pre-college concussion [OR = 0.93 (95%CI:0.88-0.98)]. Our findings suggest that there is a relationship between eAFE to football and to women's high-risk sports and concussion history.


Language: en

Keywords

American football; mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI); paediatric; repetitive head impacts

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