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Journal Article

Citation

Ricci M, Di Lazzaro G, Pisani A, Scalise S, Alwardat M, Salimei C, Giannini F, Saggio G. Sensors (Basel) 2019; 19(24): s19245465.

Affiliation

Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", 00133 Rome, Italy.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, MDPI: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)

DOI

10.3390/s19245465

PMID

31835822

Abstract

Currently, clinical evaluation represents the primary outcome measure in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, clinical evaluation may underscore some subtle motor impairments, hidden from the visual inspection of examiners. Technology-based objective measures are more frequently utilized to assess motor performance and objectively measure motor dysfunction. Gait and balance impairments, frequent complications in later disease stages, are poorly responsive to classic dopamine-replacement therapy. Although recent findings suggest that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can have a role in improving motor skills, there is scarce evidence for this, especially considering the difficulty to objectively assess motor function. Therefore, we used wearable electronics to measure motor abilities, and further evaluated the gait and balance features of 10 PD patients, before and (three days and one month) after the tDCS. To assess patients' abilities, we adopted six motor tasks, obtaining 72 meaningful motor features. According to the obtained results, wearable electronics demonstrated to be a valuable tool to measure the treatment response. Meanwhile the improvements from tDCS on gait and balance abilities of PD patients demonstrated to be generally partial and selective.


Language: en

Keywords

IMUs; Parkinson’s disease; balance; gait; transcranial direct current stimulation; wearable electronics

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