SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Shale CM, Tidwell JE, Mulligan RP, Jupiter DC, Mahabir RC. Ann. Plast. Surg. 2013; 70(6): 647-651.

Affiliation

Division of Plastic Surgery, Scott and White Healthcare, 2401 South 31st St, Temple, TX 76508, USA.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2013, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins)

DOI

10.1097/SAP.0b013e31828986c9

PMID

23673564

Abstract

Traumatic thumb amputations are a common problem with significant associated cost to patients, hospitals, and society.The purpose of this study was to review practice patterns for traumatic thumb amputations using the National Trauma Data Bank. By using a large nationwide database, we hoped to better understand the epidemiology and predictors of attempts and successful replantation.The design was a retrospective review of the National Trauma Data Bank between the years 2007 and 2010, investigating patients with traumatic thumb amputations. Analyses of these patients based on replantation attempt, mechanism of injury, and demographics were performed. Comparisons were made between hospitals based on teaching status and on patient volume for replant attempt and success rates.There were 3341 traumatic thumb amputations with 550 (16.5%) attempts at replantation and an overall success rate of 84.9%. Nonteaching hospitals treated 1238 (37.1%) patients, and attempted 123 (9.9%) replantations with a success rate of 80.5%. Teaching hospitals treated 2103 (63.0%) patients, and attempted 427 (20.3%) replantations with a success rate of 86.2%. Being in a teaching hospital increased the odds of attempted replantation by a factor of 3.1 (P < 0.001) when compared to a nonteaching hospital. Treatment at a high-volume center increased the rate of attempted replantation by a factor of 3.4 (P < 0.001), as compared to low-volume hospitals.Practice patterns show that teaching and high-volume hospitals attempt to replant a higher percentage of amputated thumbs. Success rates are similar across practice settings.


Language: en

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print