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Journal Article

Citation

Hall C, Friel K, Dong M, Engel L, O'Boyle L, Pasquarella A, Serkes D, Smith K, Stoebe L, Valle D. Res. Sports Med. 2013; 21(3): 229-239.

Affiliation

a Department of Physical Therapy , New York Institute of Technology , Old Westbury , New York , USA.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2013, Informa - Taylor and Francis Group)

DOI

10.1080/15438627.2013.792085

PMID

23777378

Abstract

Female lacrosse has grown 219% in the last decade. This descriptive study explored the epidemiology of elite female high school lacrosse injuries and compared them with those in the collegiate player. Five hundred surveys were completed at tournaments in the northeast United States. Over 60% played other sports; 50% experienced a new injury while playing lacrosse, and 16% had a recurrent injury from another sport. The ankle, knee, and head were most commonly injured. Eleven percent of respondents sustained a concussion; 35% of these experienced some loss of consciousness. Eighty-four percent of injuries occurred via contact. Forty-two percent (42%) of athletes lost 10 or more days of playing time. Frequency data showed that reported injuries are high for elite lacrosse, which is classified as a noncontact sport, and are comparable with those seen in the collegiate player.


Language: en

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