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Journal Article

Citation

Conner WC, Rohrich RJ, Pollock RA. Ann. Plast. Surg. 1998; 41(3): 321-326.

Affiliation

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas 75235-9132, USA.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1998, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

9746094

Abstract

The branches of the external carotid artery are protected from injury in most locations by an adequate buffer of soft tissue. On occasion, the vessels approach the surface to cross bone structures, and in these key areas they become vulnerable to blunt trauma. The facial, superficial temporal, and terminal branches of the internal maxillary arteries are the branches most often affected via this mechanism of injury. In addition, damage to deeper branches of the internal maxillary artery and to the subparotid portion of the superficial temporal artery has been reported secondary to maxillary fractures and craniofacial surgery. A brief patient report illustrates the highlights of clinical examination, diagnostic study, and surgical management of an aneurysm of the facial artery. A review of the world literature since 1644 has revealed 386 patients with traumatic aneurysms of the face and temple.


Language: en

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