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Journal Article

Citation

MacGeorge EL, Samter W, Feng B, Gillihan SJ, Graves AR. Health Commun. 2007; 21(1): 11-22.

Affiliation

Department of Communication, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. emacge-orge@purdue.edu

Copyright

(Copyright © 2007, Informa Healthcare)

DOI

10.1080/10410230701283272

PMID

17461748

Abstract

The terrorist attacks of 9/11 were traumatic even for Americans who were not directly victimized or in the geographic vicinity. This study examined whether emotional support received through interaction with others buffered the association between terrorism-related stress and psychological health (depression, anxiety, and physical symptoms) for individuals with lower exposure to the attacks. Five hundred eleven college students from an eastern university completed measures of goal disruption (stress) from terrorism, received emotional support, and psychological health in the first 2 weeks of December 2001. The results indicate that received emotional support moderated the relationship between goal disruption and depression and somatic symptoms. These findings suggest that the provision of emotional support should be understood as a fundamental communication skill relevant to recovery from disaster events.


Language: en

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