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Journal Article

Citation

Reilly JS, Walter MA. Ann. Otol. Rhinol. Laryngol. 1992; 101(9): 739-741.

Affiliation

Department of Surgery, University of Alabama, Birmingham.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1992, Annals Publishing)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

1514750

Abstract

Inadvertent aspiration or ingestion of products in children is a reportable problem. The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) monitors 119 hospitals for product (nonfood) hazards through a network of emergency room physicians. Coins (52%) remain the most frequently ingested object (1988-1989). Pins, including nails and bolts, are second in rank. Spheres (eg, balls) are the most common cause of death. Most deaths (97%) occur in the home. Younger children (13.4 versus 22.7 months) are more at risk for death. This analysis suggests that shape, as well as availability, is important in children's injuries and deaths. Accurate reporting to NEISS of all aspirated objects remains essential so that product safety and the public's health can be improved. Food product injuries, however, are not reported to NEISS.

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