SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Fernández-Kelly P. Am. Behav. Sci. 2008; 52(3): 377-404.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2008, SAGE Publishing)

DOI

10.1177/0002764208323512

PMID

unavailable

Abstract

This article investigates the relationship between changing gender definitions and economic development in the United States and Mexico over the course of a century. On the basis of historical research and fieldwork, the author highlights the role played by the national state in both countries in defining the proper ambit and behavior of men and women. She maintains that gender is a central vector in the organization of class hierarchies. Then, the author discusses the effects of global economic integration on gender definitions, arguing that the present era is characterized by the virtual disappearance of the family wage and growing atomization of the labor force in terms of gender. Finally, she provides an analysis of strategic sectors differentiated in terms of gender, race, and national background. Included are women working in export-processing zones, a new technocratic class residing in global cities, displaced White workers, and radicalized urban populations.

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print