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Journal Article

Citation

Oler MJ, Mainous AG, Martin CA, Richardson E, Haney A, Wilson D, Adams T. Arch. Family Med. 1994; 3(9): 781-785.

Affiliation

Family Practice Residency Program, St Elizabeth Medical Center, Dayton, Ohio.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1994, American Medical Association)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

7987512

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationship between participation in high school athletic programs and depression, suicidal ideation, and substance use, and to study the high-risk behaviors of suicidal ideation and substance use. DESIGN: Survey. SETTING: A suburban public high school in Kentucky. PARTICIPANTS: We received 823 (80%) responses from 1030 potential respondents. Athletes (ie, participation on a high school athletic team) were compared with non-athletes. MEASURES: Depression was measured by the Children's Depression Inventory by an index of suicidal ideation by an indicator of a past suicide attempt, and by current use of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine. RESULTS: Thirty percent of the sample participate in school athletic teams. Athletes are less depressed, have less suicidal ideation and attempts, and are less likely to currently smoke cigarettes or marijuana. The use of smokeless tobacco and cocaine was not related to athletic participation. After controlling for demographic characteristics, no difference in alcohol use was found between athletes and nonathletes. CONCLUSIONS: Athletic participation is a marker for a decreased likelihood of depression and some high-risk behaviors in adolescents. Future research could help in creating alternative interventions beyond participation in varsity and junior varsity athletic teams.


Language: en

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