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Journal Article

Citation

Butler DJ, Qualheim K, Turkal N, Wissing M. Arch. Family Med. 1993; 2(1): 29-33.

Affiliation

Department of Family and Community Medicine, Columbia Family Practice Residency Program, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1993, American Medical Association)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

8252133

Abstract

Although the majority of childhood sexual abuse victims are women, male children are also at risk for sexual assault and consequent long-term effects including major psychiatric disorders, substance abuse, sexual dysfunction, and somatization syndromes. Male patients sexually abused in childhood or adolescence may present to the primary-care physician with specific interpersonal or developmental crises or with persistent depression, anxiety, or somatic complaints. The physician can serve a therapeutic role by validating the patient's experience and can provide the patient with information on the prevalence and consequences of male sexual abuse. Assessment of the impact of sexual abuse will rely on the sensitive and systematic evaluation of critical variables related to the abuse. More severely traumatized patients will require assessment for suicide potential and referral for mental health services.


Language: en

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